Frome College History Club trip to Mells

22nd March 2016

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“Home of our Delight is collaborating with the students of Frome College, a local secondary school, to further the project and develop the student’s historical skills.

So far, we’ve looked at old World War One newspapers, which to be honest were mostly adverts for local products and events.  However, there were also some very interesting articles to do with the war and events in and around the Mells area.

We’ve also looked at some old World War One letters, including a few written by Raymond Asquith himself! Some of these were a walk in the park to read, but in others the handwriting was almost completely illegible!”

Oshi Francomb

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“We spent a lot of time searching through old newspapers from over 100 years ago; they were very tattered and twice as big as newspapers are today! The aim of this was to find any link to Mells and its soldiers during the war, and we managed to find quite a few obituaries and articles about them. I found a detailed article about Raymond Asquith who was the prime minister’s son and lived in Mells, sadly he died while fighting in the trenches.

Also we transcribed many letters that were written by the soldiers and sent back home to their families. These were very interesting as I found one that was thanking Lady Asquith for parcels she had sent soldiers with socks and food etc.”

Amy Nicholls

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“I really enjoyed transcribing. We read the soldiers hand writing and then tried to make out what the word was. Some of the soldiers’  handwriting was very hard to make out but some was very easy to read as you could tell what the word was. We also looked at newspapers which were from 1914-1918, and they were very big. As the years got closer to the end of the war, from around 1917, the newspapers would get thinner.  This was because there was more control about news from the front as the war dragged on, and also because there was a shortage of paper available.”

Delenn Jeffries

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